14 Apr 2012

A place to hide. Part Two.

So after getting excited and devouring the new FoW rule book (Also going to Kenya to get married.) I have finished making my woods.
I started by getting some 3mm MDF from a local DIY store and marking out rough areas of the bases and where I want the tree bases to sit on each base, I don't make them too dense as woods are area terrain and true LOS isn't involved, just enough to make the base look like a wooded area.  About 8-9 on each base.
I then router out a 1.5mm deep 26mm recess where I want each tree base to sit.  26mm twin flute router bits are not cheap and you would need a router with a 1/2" collet, I'm just lucky enough to have one available to me.  An alternative would be to use a 26mm hole cutter and gluing 2 piece of MDF together once you have the holes cut, a drill would suffice for this, though you will have thicker bases for your woods.
Or, if you have some skill with a router, making a template and using a smaller bit is also a possibility.
As I am using a 26mm bit which is designed for cutting channels there is a small raised area in the centre of each recess, these are easily chiselled away.
The more astute of you will of already realised I routered out the recesses before cutting the bases out, this makes the sheet of MDF easier to control when you are using a tool trying to spin it around at a rate of knots.  So once I have all the recesses done I cut the bases out (I have a tabletop fret saw, but a jig saw would do just as well.) sand the edges and am ready to proceed.
I found some pre-cut, 25mm, self adhesive, magnetic discs on the Magnetic Displays website, and decided it was worthwhile buying these rather than cutting out my own from some magnetic paper.  It was a simple matter of peeling of the backing and sticking them in the holes, though I decided to spread a bit of contact adhesive in each hole before doing this to improve the chances of them not coming out in the future.
Then once the magnets are in place I can set the trees (Based on steel washers, remember.) into the recesses and not worry about them moving.
I can even tilt the base and the trees stay put.
And when they get in the way they are easily moved.

All I need to do now is finish the bases to match my other terrain.  I have a different method to show you that is more modular in its approach and is really simple, but that will wait for part three.

9 comments:

  1. I might have to do that sometimes in the future as it's a brilliant idea.

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  2. Cheers, don't know how original it is. Congrats on being my 1st comment ever.

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  3. Nice job but is the extra work routing, chiselling installing magnets etc really worth the effort? Could you not just base the trees and move them when needed?

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    1. You could leave them as at the end of part one, but then you loose the defined area of woods, and I've found just setting them on an area base leads to empty woods as trees get removed from the table after getting knocked over. And the wordworking is very quick, hand pressure does the chiselling.

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  4. The only thing that lets down this otherwise brilliant project are the edges of the board. If you chamfer them they look so much better. Of course this might be the next stage for all I know, you probably could do it with a router.

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    1. I normally do set my fret saw to 45 degrees but I made a decision not to, though I can't remember what that decision was made on. No doubt I'll remember some early morning.

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    2. I remebered my reasoning for not bevelling the edges of the woods, these are being built for club and tournament use and bevelled edges get damaged easily. I don't mind building terrain but hate repairing it. (Especially when I discover the damage rather than getting told about it.

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  5. Congrats for the wedding!! ;)

    (And for the tut, of course!!)

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    1. Cheers.

      And thanks for shaing these with a wider audience.

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